Small Impact

3rd December - 9th January

Online Exhibition

Forest + Found
Rain Wu
Brooke Holm
Andrew Lansley
Todd McMillan
Anthony Hodgkinson
Siobhan McDonald
Anthony White
Brian Grimwood
Diane Chappalley
Harriet Hellman

Rain Wu, Sea Rises and Totally Still, Installation view, 2020

Selected works are available to view by appointment in the gallery
Informality is delighted to share an online presentation, showing a selection of small works which represent several artists' who have participated in the galleries programme since its inception just over a year ago.

Artists among the exhibition include Forest + Found, Rain Wu, Brooke Holm, Andrew Lansley, Todd McMillan, Anthony Hodgkinson, Siobhan McDonald, Anthony White, Brian Grimwood, Diane Chappalley and Harriet Hellman.

Small Impact celebrates the galleries main focus on artists who seek ways of making work about the environment and also shares its support for artists from Australasia as well as artists whose works reinvent traditional mediums
Forest + Found
Artist duo, Forest + Found, consists of artists, Abigail Booth and Max Bainbridge. Forest + Found work with raw materials which are sourced directly from evolving rural and urban landscapes, their work explores identity and place through expanded material histories and hand-work. Raw wood, textile and natural pigments are elements that ground their individual practices in a material investigation of the object and textile surface as a critical space for their interaction with the natural. Bainbridge’s exploration of the living tree is rooted in the physicality of the embodied vessel and carved, object, while Booth’s patchworked and painted canvases explore the psycho-natural surface of the constructed, textile image.
Rain Wu
The Sea Rises and Totally Still, 2020 is a new series of work by the artist which uses perishable materials as sculptural mediums to investigate materials and their full-spectrum of meanings from symbolic, aesthetic to cultural and visceral ones. This series of imaginary maps made of boiled-down seawater, is an act of reconciliation with nature by drawing directly from it and allowing the artwork to dissolve back into the landscape. Geographer and writer Alastair Bonnett poignantly pointed out ‘when the world is fully codified and collated... a sense of loss arises.’ Each seawater painting is of a fictitious place, for that maps should be about imaginations, not domination.
Brooke Holm
Brooke Holm's Sea Lake series depicts Lake Tyrrell in Australia. Lake Tyrrell is Victoria’s largest salt lake, where evidence of human habitation has been found and documented as the oldest among the states of Victoria and Tasmania. In this historically profound site of early human and nature bonding, Brooke shows a contemporary appreciation, explored from an aerial perspective, creating abstract visuals that show the shallow crusted lake in a swirl of texture and color.
Harriet Hellman
Harriet Hellman's practice is centered on the concerns with coastal erosion and rising sea levels, specifically the wild Atlantic coastline of North Devon, England. The ceaseless cycle of the natural elements, the effect of climate change on the coastline embeds itself in Hellman's work both physically and emotionally. The process of layering, tearing and building with the clay creates a visceral response which is both immediate and meditative for the artist. Hellman's work balances imperfection and impermanence, searching for liminal spaces while reflecting on our ecological fragility.
Anthony White
Anthony White explores the intersection of societal issues, both current and historical, and how these relate to the production of contemporary image making. His research-based approach to painting is combined with an awareness of surface and a preoccupation with the engagement of physicality and the found object.

This work was created in collaboration Atelier Michael Woolworth, experimenting with lithographic processes at Woolworth Publications, Paris.

Working with paper for White is an active place for the artists' experimentation. The results from the collaboration took the work in a new graphic direction.
Andrew Lansley
Lansley has long had a focus on Antarctica, creating polar images long before his expedition to the Southern Ocean with the Royal Navy. His previous travels had taken him to Norway and Greenland and the experience of Antarctica altogether would prove to be a more powerful experience. The artist returned from Antarctica with an extensive folio of sketches, ink drawings and over 5,000 photographs, the memory and the environment now documented in a cache of visual material.
Diane Chappalley
"When the pandemic began to spread in Europe, I started to look into how artists in the past have responded to the plagues of their time. This research has led to my current body of work inspired by the cult and imagery of Saint Sebastian. Saint Sebastian, the protector of the plague comes from a folkloric interpretation as well as a religious one; involving the interplay between religious and secular views on the human body and disease. By putting the natural world at the centre, my paintings reflect upon our relationship with the environment and contrast our society of consumerism, technology and ecological distress. They are an attempt to articulate the fragility of ourselves and of the world we inhabit.".

Diane Chappalley 2020
Todd McMillan
McMillan’s Cloud Studies are delicate watercolours, mounted to board, coated in a epoxy resin, the works evoke contemporary, melancholic abstractions, and are a poetic reference of the sky.
Anthony Hodgkinson
Hodgkinson's work seeks to identify the emotion of the landscape by allowing nature to take partial control of the process within his practice. To Hodgkinson, a photograph is about more than just the visual documentation of the landscape; it is a record of the experience within the landscape. Often in the artist's work the film is engraved, scarred and agitated, chance creates a presence. Hodgkinson reminds us that we are not here to succeed or pass nature, but to share a unified romance with the landscape.
Siobhan McDonald
Siobhán’s practice draws attention to contemporary topics dealing with air, breath and atmospheric phenomena, weaving scientific knowledge into her art in a poetic and thoughtful manner. Across research labs, she pursues knowledge to ask questions about the structure and history of the earth. She calls on notions of what is still unknown to science, exploring the Anthropocene and the recent consequences of our treatment of nature. Siobhan’s work with glaciers and other natural phenomena deploys a unique artistic language that gives form to intangible and richly varied processes including painting, drawing, film and sound.
Brian Grimwood
Brian Grimwood is a renowned figure in illustration, described by the print magazine ‘as the man who changed the look of British illustration’. Brian Grimwood is mostly recognised for his loose and playful imagery, and has created his own vision for drawing and is an exceptional colourist.